Be part of a movement to increase energy efficiency in commercial buildings. This program is designed to support the US Department of Energy’s Better Building Initiative goal of improving commercial energy efficiency up to 20 percent. It also supports the New Jersey Master Plan call to reduce all levels of electrical use. New Jersey has more than 450,000 commercial  buildings that consume approximately 50% of the state’s electricity.

Program Coordinator, Paul Flor: 908-526-1200 x8577 or paul.flor@raritanval.edu

Commercial Energy Management Technician

Learn the skills you need to become a successful commercial energy management technician in a modern facility with the latest testers, instrumentation and equipment. The program was developed in partnership with local industry experts. You’ll also gain valuable, hands-on experience in mechanical systems by working in our campus’ living lab.

Consider one of two options:

  • 1-year Certificate – Prepares you for an entry-level technician position.

  • 2-year AAS Degree – Prepares you for any level CEM Tech position.

Job assistance is available for all graduates. The programs is eligible for federal and state student financial aid.

To enroll in either program you must have a high school diploma or equivalency. 

The Certificate in Commercial Energy Management Technology (CEM-Tech) caters in a particular way to the currently employed Building, Energy and/or Automation professional who is interested in acquiring additional know-how that will help propel her/his career to the next level.  It is also helpful to entry-level LEED and/or junior engineering majors who would like to benefit from learning the practical aspects of Auditing, Direct Digital Control, Web-based Networking and integration, and the Commissioning process.  Certificate students receive instruction in quantitative and manipulative skills associated with web-based Digital Controls, Controller hardware and software setup and troubleshooting, networking, integration and programming as it applies to building automation; building walk-throughs for the identification of Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECOs), Level 1 & Level-2 Energy Audits, Analysis of Equipment/System performance and the Commissioning Process.

Graduates are able to:

  • assemble, program, troubleshoot and network Direct Digital Controllers
  • use engineering manuals and programs for analysis and verification of equipment performance
  • learn to use tools and testing instruments used in the field by Energy Auditors and Building Commissioning Agents
  • perform building walk-throughs and assemble Energy Audit reports, together with the use of Energy Auditing software
  • identify the various types of commercial HVAC systems that are most often seen in commercial sites
  • define, specify, plan and verify the check-out, start-up, and functional testing of building systems, using RVCC’s buildings for learning

CURRICULUM

Summer I Semester

CISY 119
Networking Essentials 3 Credits

This course introduces the student to basic concepts and operations of computer networks.

Particular emphasis is placed on demonstrating how important Networks, and especially the Internet, have become for today’s global businesses. Networks are examined from the SOHO (Small Office Home Office), SMB (Small and Medium Business), and Enterprise (very large networks) perspective. Network topologies and protocols are examined for LANs (Local Area Networks) and WANs (Wide Area Networks) and the Internet. The OSI and TCP/IP reference models serve as a foundation for understanding networking in the 21st Century. The concepts of Network Design, Network Management and Network Security are introduced.

Fall Semester

CEMT 201
Energy Management & Auditing I 4 Credits

This is an entry-level course for students in the Commercial Energy Management Technology field.  Responsible use of our Energy Resources is important in many respects, not the least of which is that much of it is not renewable.  We as a society need to be conscientious about this fact and be good stewards of our resources so future generations are able to enjoy living on a planet that can support them and their offspring.  Optimizing energy consumption in homes and buildings is also important to reduce carbon emissions and the financial burden which is the cost of operating these structures, thus increasing profitability.  Saving energy makes financial sense.  People who are knowledgeable about ways to save energy are a valuable and limited commodity.

This course covers an introduction to utility bill analysis, learning about common energy conservation measures, conducting walk-through level-1 energy audits, determining energy use of specific equipment, breaking out where all the energy in a structure is used, calculating energy savings, prioritizing energy saving measures, and pulling all this information into a simple report: The Energy Audit Report.

CEMT 203
Building Automation I 4 Credits

This is the first of two advanced courses on building automation for students in the Commercial Energy Management Technology field.  Recent emphasis on increased energy efficiency and occupant comfort, in particular on commercial buildings, has given way to the development of technologies that allow for smart communication amongst various building systems such as HVAC, Lighting, Fire Prevention and Occupant Security/Safety.  Networked building automation has become a field in high demand because it allows for precise and reliable communication between control devices, whether they are from the same or different manufacturers.

This course starts with a review of the fundamentals of Automatic Control: control loops, control points, control responses, HVAC equipment automation options and the classification of building automation systems.  It then continues with an overview of wired and wireless networking: the OSI model, Ethernet networks, network Architectures, client versus server computers and their associated control systems, system security, diagnosing and troubleshooting.

ENGL 111
English Composition I 3 Credits

English Composition I is the first in a two-course composition sequence. The central purposes of English Composition I are to develop critical reading and thinking skills and to write thesis-driven, text-based essays. The course takes a process-oriented approach to writing that incorporates prewriting, drafting, reviewing, and revising. Students in English Composition I learn basic research skills and apply them to at least one text-based research essay.

MATH 106
Technical Math 3 Credits

This course serves as General Education Mathematics course for A.A.S. degrees only.  Intended for students in technology programs who have elementary algebra proficiency and need to apply mathematical concepts in a technical program. Topics including ratios and proportions, metric measures, geometry, practical algebra, and elementary trigonometry are covered with emphasis upon their application to technology.

Spring Semester

CEMT 202
Energy Management & Auditing II 4 Credits

This is a course for students in the Commercial Energy Management Technology field that builds upon the basic concepts learned in CEMT-201 and continues with a more detailed examination of building energy systems, including a detailed analysis of its various components such as Building Envelope, Lighting, HVAC, Domestic Hot Water, Plug Loads, and Compressed Air and Process Uses.  A necessary next step will then take the student into detailed energy analyses of energy consumption that aim at quantifying base loads, seasonal variation, and efficient energy costs; and from there to the study and assessment of lighting, air quality, temperature, ventilation, and other conditions affecting performance and human comfort.  Computer simulation will be introduced to estimate changes in energy usage resulting from potential optimization that ensues from the implementation of a number of Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs).

CEMT 204
Building Automation II 4 Credits

This is the second of two advanced courses on building automation for students in the Commercial Energy Management Technology field.  Recent emphasis placed on increased energy efficiency and occupant comfort, in particular on commercial buildings, has given way to the development of technologies that allow for smart communication amongst various building systems such as HVAC, Lighting, Fire Prevention and Occupant Security/Safety.  Networked building automation, in particular, has become a field in high demand because it allows for precise and reliable communication between control devices, whether they are from the same or different manufacturers.

This course starts with an introduction to the various commercially available network platforms, with special emphasis on LonWorks: an overview of the technology, its architecture and infrastructure, nodes, programming, testing and maintenance.  It then continues with an introduction to Communications Protocol BACnet: an overview of its architecture, testing and certification standards, transport and interoperability, objects and core services, applications, installation and configuration.  Finally, the course addresses System Integration.

CEMT 205
Building Commissioning and Retro Commissioning 4 Credits

This is an advanced course for students in the Commercial Energy Management Technology field.  Building Commissioning and Retro Commissioning are means of ensuring that a building owner gets the quality of facility that is expected.  It is a process that involves numerous activities and spans the full life of the building delivery process.  “The Commissioning Process is a quality-oriented set of procedures for verifying and documenting that the performance of facilities, systems and assemblies meets defined objectives and criteria…” [ASHRAE Guideline 1.1-2007]

This accelerated course that takes students through the Commissioning (Cx) Process.  Topics include the benefits of Cx and why it is important. The basics of the Cx Process will be discussed and sample documents developed by course participants.  Upon completion of the course, participants will have an understanding of the Cx certifications.  To be successful in this course, a prior knowledge of building mechanical systems and a good computer skillset are required (word processing, presentation software, and spreadsheets).

Summer II Semester

CEMT 290
Commercial Energy Management Technology Cooperative Education 3 Credits

This course serves as an introductory work program in a component of Commercial Energy Management Technology work that provides an experiential learning opportunity for students interested in pursuing a career in this field. Students will be exposed to the roles performed by Building Automation Specialists, Energy Auditors/Managers and/or Building Commissioning/Retro-Commissioning agents.  Students will be encouraged to observe and critically analyze the day-to-day operation of the contracting firm for which they will work and apply theoretical as well as practical concepts learned in the classroom to the work environment.

Total Credits 32

The AAS in Commercial Energy Management Technology (CEM-Tech) prepares students to start careers as Energy, Facilities, Operations, Building, Plant, and Maintenance managers; Energy Auditors and/or Technicians; Maintenance Supervisors, Building & Grounds superintendents; Building Automation Technicians/Programmers/Engineers; Project Engineers and/or Project Managers; New Construction Technicians and/or Sales Associates.  Graduates are qualified for employment with HVAC Control companies, Physical Plant Departments in colleges, universities, hospitals, government buildings, commercial, and industrial facilities. Students receive instruction in quantitative and manipulative skills associated with web-based Digital Controls, Controller hardware and software set-up and troubleshooting, networking, integration and programming as it applies to building automation; building walk-throughs for the identification of Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECOs), Level 1 & Level-2 Energy Audits, Analysis of Equipment/System performance and the Commissioning Process.

Graduates are able to:

  • assemble, program, troubleshoot and network Direct Digital Controllers
  • use engineering manuals and programs for analysis and verification of equipment performance
  • learn to use tools and testing instruments used in the field by Energy Auditors and Building Commissioning Agents
  • perform building walk-throughs and assemble Energy Audit reports, together with the use of Energy Auditing software
  • identify the various types of commercial HVAC systems that are most often seen in commercial sites
  • define, specify, plan and verify the check-out, start-up, and functional testing of building systems, using RVCC’s buildings for learning

CURRICULUM

First Semester

CISY 119
Networking Essentials 3 Credits

This course introduces the student to basic concepts and operations of computer networks.

Particular emphasis is placed on demonstrating how important Networks, and especially the Internet, have become for today’s global businesses. Networks are examined from the SOHO (Small Office Home Office), SMB (Small and Medium Business), and Enterprise (very large networks) perspective. Network topologies and protocols are examined for LANs (Local Area Networks) and WANs (Wide Area Networks) and the Internet. The OSI and TCP/IP reference models serve as a foundation for understanding networking in the 21st Century. The concepts of Network Design, Network Management and Network Security are introduced.

ECTC 103
Electricity for Environmental Control Technology I 2 Credits

An entry-level course designed to provide the student with the essentials of DC and AC electricity, as well as the necessary electrical background to pursue the more advanced instrumentation and control courses. Instruction will also include instructor-directed bench work and hands-on work on trainers using the latest in electrical instrumentation to introduce the student to basic electrical testing and troubleshooting procedures.

ECTC 202
Heating Systems Design 5 Credits

This is a course which deals primarily with the application of the fundamental facts of engineering to the practical design of central heating systems, primarily hydronic in nature. Previous knowledge of heat transfer processes as applicable to air conditioning design is desirable.  Classroom instruction consists of engineering design and analysis of hot water (baseboards), steam (radiators), radiant (warm floors), hot air (ducted),  and geothermal heating systems. Throughout the semester, the student is also trained in the selection of equipment and peripheral components, and in the use of engineering-design and computer aided equipment selection software.  Particular attention is given to understanding the inherent system inefficiencies that occur due to either over-or under-sizing system components and their negative impact on energy consumption and equipment life expectancy.  Students are trained throughout the semester in proper sizing techniques for system performance optimization and energy conservation.

ENGL 111
English Composition I 3 Credits

English Composition I is the first in a two-course composition sequence. The central purposes of English Composition I are to develop critical reading and thinking skills and to write thesis-driven, text-based essays. The course takes a process-oriented approach to writing that incorporates prewriting, drafting, reviewing, and revising. Students in English Composition I learn basic research skills and apply them to at least one text-based research essay.

MATH 106
Technical Math 3 Credits

This course serves as General Education Mathematics course for A.A.S. degrees only.  Intended for students in technology programs who have elementary algebra proficiency and need to apply mathematical concepts in a technical program. Topics including ratios and proportions, metric measures, geometry, practical algebra, and elementary trigonometry are covered with emphasis upon their application to technology.

Second Semester

Communication 3 Credits

ECTC 102
Air Conditioning Systems Design 6 Credits

This course deals primarily with the application of the fundamentals of engineering to the practical design of air conditioning systems. The course begins with the concepts of human comfort and their dependence on the proper conditioning of air, continues with cooling load estimating, psychometric analysis, indoor air quality issues, the design of the air distribution system, and the selection of the air conditioning unit and peripheral components. Throughout the semester, the student is also trained in the use of engineering design software and computer-aided equipment selection software.  Particular attention is given to understanding the inherent system inefficiencies that occur due to either over-or under-sizing air conditioning system components and their negative impact on energy consumption and equipment life expectancy.  Students are trained throughout the semester in proper sizing techniques for system performance optimization and energy conservation.

ECTC 104
Electricity for Environmental Control Technology II 2 Credits

This course exposes the student to a variety of controls which are part of refrigeration and air-conditioning systems; its aim is to develop a working knowledge of schematics and wiring diagrams. Course instruction seeks to build understanding of such controls as the student integrates them into fully-operational electrical circuits. This course fosters knowledge of refrigeration and air-conditioning circuits by assembling groups of controls in simulators and actual equipment. The student will get to see first-hand the operation of motor starters, refrigeration and air conditioning equipment ranging in size from the small window mounted unit to the more complex home and office central air conditioning systems.

PHYS 112
Concepts of Physics 4 Credits

This course is an introduction to the concepts of physics and their application to real-world phenomena.  Emphasis is on understanding the phenomena through demonstrations, experience, and experiments in physics and not through mathematical manipulations.  This course may be used as a science elective for non-science majors and is required for students majoring in many of the medical and technology programs.  It is also recommended for those taking General Physics without a strong high school science background.  Topics include classical mechanics, properties of matter, heat and the laws of thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, vibration and waves, sound, and optics.  Credit towards graduation will not be given for both Concepts of Physics and General or Engineering Physics.

Third Semester

CEMT 201
Energy Management & Auditing I 4 Credits

This is an entry-level course for students in the Commercial Energy Management Technology field.  Responsible use of our Energy Resources is important in many respects, not the least of which is that much of it is not renewable.  We as a society need to be conscientious about this fact and be good stewards of our resources so future generations are able to enjoy living on a planet that can support them and their offspring.  Optimizing energy consumption in homes and buildings is also important to reduce carbon emissions and the financial burden which is the cost of operating these structures, thus increasing profitability.  Saving energy makes financial sense.  People who are knowledgeable about ways to save energy are a valuable and limited commodity.

This course covers an introduction to utility bill analysis, learning about common energy conservation measures, conducting walk-through level-1 energy audits, determining energy use of specific equipment, breaking out where all the energy in a structure is used, calculating energy savings, prioritizing energy saving measures, and pulling all this information into a simple report: The Energy Audit Report.

CEMT 203
Building Automation I 4 Credits

This is the first of two advanced courses on building automation for students in the Commercial Energy Management Technology field.  Recent emphasis on increased energy efficiency and occupant comfort, in particular on commercial buildings, has given way to the development of technologies that allow for smart communication amongst various building systems such as HVAC, Lighting, Fire Prevention and Occupant Security/Safety.  Networked building automation has become a field in high demand because it allows for precise and reliable communication between control devices, whether they are from the same or different manufacturers.

This course starts with a review of the fundamentals of Automatic Control: control loops, control points, control responses, HVAC equipment automation options and the classification of building automation systems.  It then continues with an overview of wired and wireless networking: the OSI model, Ethernet networks, network Architectures, client versus server computers and their associated control systems, system security, diagnosing and troubleshooting.

ENVI 102
Environmental Science and Sustainability 4 Credits

This is an interdisciplinary lecture and laboratory course that uses a scientific approach to analyze the biophysical, social, political, and economic causes and consequences of environmental problems. Students will be encouraged to explore how these concepts and issues relate to their own lives, from both global and local perspectives. Students will study existing solutions and develop concepts and designs for their own potential solutions to common environmental problems documented on campus, at home, or in the surrounding community. Students will gain hands-on experience and build skills in environmental science and research through field work, group projects inside and outside the classroom, and service learning opportunities. The course will use campus sustainability as an overarching framework to introduce students to the theory and practice of environmental science. Students cannot receive credit for both ENVI 101 and ENVI 102.

Social Science 3 Credits

or

Humanities 3 Credits

Fourth Semester

CEMT 202
Energy Management & Auditing II 4 Credits

This is a course for students in the Commercial Energy Management Technology field that builds upon the basic concepts learned in CEMT-201 and continues with a more detailed examination of building energy systems, including a detailed analysis of its various components such as Building Envelope, Lighting, HVAC, Domestic Hot Water, Plug Loads, and Compressed Air and Process Uses.  A necessary next step will then take the student into detailed energy analyses of energy consumption that aim at quantifying base loads, seasonal variation, and efficient energy costs; and from there to the study and assessment of lighting, air quality, temperature, ventilation, and other conditions affecting performance and human comfort.  Computer simulation will be introduced to estimate changes in energy usage resulting from potential optimization that ensues from the implementation of a number of Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs).

CEMT 204
Building Automation II 4 Credits

This is the second of two advanced courses on building automation for students in the Commercial Energy Management Technology field.  Recent emphasis placed on increased energy efficiency and occupant comfort, in particular on commercial buildings, has given way to the development of technologies that allow for smart communication amongst various building systems such as HVAC, Lighting, Fire Prevention and Occupant Security/Safety.  Networked building automation, in particular, has become a field in high demand because it allows for precise and reliable communication between control devices, whether they are from the same or different manufacturers.

This course starts with an introduction to the various commercially available network platforms, with special emphasis on LonWorks: an overview of the technology, its architecture and infrastructure, nodes, programming, testing and maintenance.  It then continues with an introduction to Communications Protocol BACnet: an overview of its architecture, testing and certification standards, transport and interoperability, objects and core services, applications, installation and configuration.  Finally, the course addresses System Integration.

CEMT 205
Building Commissioning and Retro Commissioning 4 Credits

This is an advanced course for students in the Commercial Energy Management Technology field.  Building Commissioning and Retro Commissioning are means of ensuring that a building owner gets the quality of facility that is expected.  It is a process that involves numerous activities and spans the full life of the building delivery process.  “The Commissioning Process is a quality-oriented set of procedures for verifying and documenting that the performance of facilities, systems and assemblies meets defined objectives and criteria…” [ASHRAE Guideline 1.1-2007]

This accelerated course that takes students through the Commissioning (Cx) Process.  Topics include the benefits of Cx and why it is important. The basics of the Cx Process will be discussed and sample documents developed by course participants.  Upon completion of the course, participants will have an understanding of the Cx certifications.  To be successful in this course, a prior knowledge of building mechanical systems and a good computer skillset are required (word processing, presentation software, and spreadsheets).

CEMT 290
Commercial Energy Management Technology Cooperative Education 3 Credits

This course serves as an introductory work program in a component of Commercial Energy Management Technology work that provides an experiential learning opportunity for students interested in pursuing a career in this field. Students will be exposed to the roles performed by Building Automation Specialists, Energy Auditors/Managers and/or Building Commissioning/Retro-Commissioning agents.  Students will be encouraged to observe and critically analyze the day-to-day operation of the contracting firm for which they will work and apply theoretical as well as practical concepts learned in the classroom to the work environment.

Total Credits 61